Lova headband pattern by Chicory Sticks in fuzzy alpaca blend yarn.

Lova Knitted Headband

Quick Summary

  • Small project, perfect for using leftover skeins and scraps.
  • Simple lace – 4 row repeat suitable for beginners.
  • Use any weight of yarn!
  • Add optional beads.
  • Video demonstrations and tutorials to answer common questions.
Girl with a blond ponytail wearing a vibrant blue Lova knitted headband with old beads.

Lova is the Swedish verb for “promise” and I really like how it also happens to be one letter off from “love” in English. Despite the many hard and overwhelming days of motherhood, Jag lovar (I promise) to love and cherish and celebrate my daughter’s childhood. I promise to celebrate her baby curls with an extra soft merino band and sparkly bauble. I promise to sit and drink a hundred cups of coffee at her ‘Princess Cafe’ when she dresses up as Cinderella to play barista with me. I promise to be prepared (finally, for once!) to send her to school with a cute accessory for one of those minor holidays like St Patrick’s Day or Halloween.

Lova is a knitted band of lace that is quick to make and versatile in its uses. It can be a headband, a belt, an ear warmer, a ribbon, a bracelet, a strap for a purse – anything you can make with a decorative band of slightly elastic fabric. Here are the projects I frequently make:

Headbands:

Light purple Lova knitted headband in mohair blend yarn.

A fingering weight yarn makes a 1 inch (2.5cm) headband for babies, kids and adults. Most headbands require less than 30 yards (27 meters) of yarn – a perfect use for the end of a luxury skein!

Little girl in purple, green and gold Madi Gras outfit with Lova beaded headband.

You can also add beads using a crochet hook. I like to use size 6/0 seed beads but both smaller (8/0) and larger (2/0) sizes work as well. The color combinations are endless for holidays and dress-up costumes.

(P.S. that Mardi Gras scarf will be the next pattern coming out this year!)

Ear Warmers:

Pink Lova knitted ear warmer knit in super bulky weight yarn.

The same pattern knit in a bulky or super bulky weight yarn creates an ear warmer. Again, most only take about 26 yards (24 meters) of yarn and you can finish the whole project while watching a movie.

Little girl wearing hand knit ear warmer in fuzzy blue yarn.

Experiment holding two strands of lighter weight yarn together for a cozy, oversized headband. This blue one was made with two strands of fuzzy DK weight yarn held together.

Belts and Straps:

Vivid pink linen belt dividing a hand knit green top from a navy blue linen skirt.

If you have 100% plant yarns leftover in your stash (linen, cotton, Tencel, etc.) these make beautiful belts and straps. Block these aggressively after soaking to really open up the lace. I will be making an entire post dedicated to belts once I have more photographs.

The pink linen belt in this photograph was made with scraps I had leftover from another project.

Pattern Support

A video of me explaining a technique as I work it from start to finish is the best way I can answer questions through the internet. There are different ways to join the finished band into a circle to create a headband and I have made several videos demonstrating these methods as well as the other stitches used in the pattern.

For now, they are on the Chicory Sticks YouTube Channel. I will be making individual tutorial pages for them in the future as well, with step-by-step still photographs.

Hand knit baby leg warmers in the Lova Pattern.

You might hear me mention “Lova Leg Warmers” in one of the bead videos. I designed matching leg warmers which will be written up and added to this pattern in the future!

Exact Yarn Amounts and Needle Sizes

Here is where I cannot be perfectly helpful. For a project this small and versatile it’s not possible to give precise numbers for the amount of yarn a project will use or what needle size to try first. What I have done instead is recorded the details of dozens of my own Lova projects as examples to get you started. Take a look at the following pages, broken up by yarn weight, to get an idea of what worked for me and then experiment with the yarn and needles you have on hand.

If you use Ravelry, the project section of Lova’s page has many examples and helpful suggestions as well.

You can purchase this pattern and find detailed information about each of the samples shown on Ravelry:

Ravelry logo

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